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Friday, April 27, 2012

Last Week in TV #30

A short one this week, with many shows gear up for May sweeps starting next week and the Fox Sunday night animation block skipped in favor of the network's 25th anniversary special (which I did watch but didn't write about, because there wasn't much to write about, so if you too watched and want to comment on it, have at it).

Game of Thrones: Garden of Bones


So apparently Melisandre's womb is dark and full of terrors, amiright? That was a pretty crazy ending, so let's start there.

Renly's Camp
There were three significant scenes set at Renly's camp in this episode. The latest concluded with Melisandre apparently giving birth to Smokey from Lost. While it's obviously too early to make any serious conclusions about what that thing is or does, it is interesting simply because up to now most of the magical elements on this show have been constrained to the edges of the world: north of the Wall, across the Narrow Sea, etc. Melisandre's shadow baby is really the first instance of real, obvious magic occurring more or less in the heart of Westeros, which seems like a significant thing.

Earlier, we got a nifty little verbal showdown between Stannis and Renly, with some excellently-written barbs between the two. I don't dislike Renly the way, say, I abhor Joffrey, and his idea that he deserves the crown because the people like him is, while clearly self-serving, also interesting in a pseudo-democratic kind of way, but at the same time, I kind of hope Stannis takes him down a peg or two; he's becoming far too cocky thanks to his superior numbers.

And finally, there were the two scenes of Baelish doing his thing within Renly's camp. His conversation with Margaery was the usual Baelish double talk, but his scene with Caetlyn was fantastic. It was great to see him drop his cool veneer, no matter how idiotic his idea that he and Caetlyn could somehow be together now (and yet he was still playing the game, making Caetlyn think Cersei had both her daughters under her control). And while I've never been a big fan of Caetlyn (her impulsiveness sometimes seems to cause more harm than good), her reaction to getting Ned's body back was a phenomenal bit of acting.

Qarth
Daenrys got a little bit more time than usual in this episode, as her ragged band of misfits arrives at the seeming oasis of Qarth. Most of what happened here was likely setup for the next chapter of her story (a chapter that will, I fear for my fingers, includes lots of Xaro Xhoan Daxos, the guy who vouched for her and whose name I just had to copy/paste), but I did like the continued glimpse into Daenerys leadership style, as she managed to strike the right tone of regal authority and humble supplication to get her group inside the city's walls.

Harrenhal
So this place is all kinds of messed up. My brother, who serves as my book-to-screen analyst, tells me we're supposed to be slightly in the dark about what information the torturers are after at this point, but regardless, that whole "rat in the bucket" technique is pretty messed up. It's odd to say this about Tywin Lannister, but it was a relief to see him show up and tell everyone to knock it the hell off. His immediate recognition of Arya as a girl was great, and the idea of the missing Stark girl hiding under everyone's noses as Tywin's cup-bearer is both dryly funny and rich with dramatic promise. It's also nice to have at least one villain on the show who isn't a complete twit.  

King's Landing
Speaking of twits, the other thing everyone's been talking about aside from the baby Smoke Monster is Joffrey. Whether you inferred that he was ordering Roz to use that stag head scepter as a club or...something else, that scene was extremely intense and made clear what a psychopathic asshat the kid is. But it also did more than that. The earlier scene with Joffrey ordering the brutalization of Sansa in retribution for Robb's victory had made clear what a monster he is. But as abhorrent as his actions in the later scene were in and of themselves, and as much as he was personally enjoying it, Joffrey also made it clear that he was doing it to send his uncle a message. Thus, that scene showed us that Joffrey has finally become aware of the game, and is learning how to play it.

Other Thoughts
Nothing from Pyke, Winterfell or north of the Wall this week.

The depiction of Robb's sneak attack was a nifty way to once again avoid depicting a large scale (and expensive) battle, and while I can understand the desire to do so and appreciate the clever ways its sidestepped, I hope that at some point we do get to see some kind of large armed conflict on the show.

Tyrion got a couple more fun moments, first when he swooped in to save Sansa and gave Joffrey's knight a lesson in threats, and later when he manipulated his cousin into spying on Cersei for him.

Arya seems to have adopted Yoren's technique of repeating the names of the people from whom she wants to extract vengeance as she falls asleep.  

Lannister Soldier: How good could he be? He's been stabbing Renly Baratheon for years and Renly ain't dead.


Once Upon a Time: The Return


So while this episode hinted pretty heavily that Mysterious Sexy Writer was Rumpelstiltskin's son Baelfire, about halfway through, I began to doubt it, simply because they were laying it on too thick. I mention this not to tout my own cleverness, but to point out that whatever enjoyment I had for the fairy back this week had little to do with MSW's identity (or lack therefore). While the episode made us think it was answering the question "who is MSW"?" it was actually answering the question of why Rumpelstiltskin made the curse in the first place. While perhaps not as immediate a question as MSW's identity, it was still a question that needed answering, and like the origins of the Regina/Snow conflict, received a pretty decent explanation.

Events back in Storybrooke weren't quite as enjoyable, as Emma's cliffhanger-y declaration that she's getting back her son rang a bit hollow, considering she has yet to do anything very active in opposing Regina, and because we've seen, again and again, just how much Regina has stacked the deck in her favor, so its hard to imagine there's anything Emma could actually do to carry out her threat. That said, we're only two episodes removed from the season finale, so I sure as hell hope Emma starts doing something significant.

Other Thoughts
So if not Baelfire, who is MSW? Lots of people have been saying Pinocchio, and next week's previews seem to suggest that, but then again, this week's suggested he was Rumpelstiltskin's son. I'm less concerned with who he is and more concerned with how he knows about FTL and seemingly existed outside Storybrooke.

Also, I do hope the real Baelfire does show up in Storybrooke at some point.

It was fun watching Regina and Gold openly discuss FTL stuff in Storybrooke.

Regina having Sydney take the fall for her is almost beautiful in how obvious it is and how much she doesn't care.

The town suddenly embracing Mary Margaret seemed odd (though Henry buying her a "congrats on not killing someone" gift was great), considering they were mad at her before for being a home wrecker, and she still is, even if she was being framed for murder. I suppose everyone's just calling it even at this point.

Someday I hope to be described as a "typewriter wrapped in an enigma wrapped in stubble".



Glee: Big Brother


This episode serves as a good example of how Glee's schizophrenia is both its biggest problem and it's greatest asset.  On the one hand, this episode simply demolished whatever tension the schlocky soap opera cliffhanger established by breezing past the aftermath of Quinn's accident and Rachel and Finn's almost wedding (which further degrades that already ridiculous cliffhanger), and I can only imagine what that was like for anyone who waited weeks between the episodes (and is more emotionally invested in the show) instead of the one week I waited.

That said, once this episode had breezed through the dangling plot threads from the last episode, it settled into a perfectly good episode of Glee and a fantastic showcase for Blaine. Glee can be infuriating in the way that it ping pongs from plot point to plot point with little resolution (or often times, sense). But it's also remarkable how the show can shift focus from character to character each week, and as long as the material is solid, end up telling a good story. Or, to put it in a less long winded way, the way this episode handled the cliffhanger was terrible, but the rest of the episode was pretty damned enjoyable, and if you don't like what Glee is doing, wait an episode or two and it will probably be back to do something you like.

Other Thoughts
For the most part, I did like the Quinn storyline (even if I didn't like the way it came about), though it felt a bit rushed. Going from "comfortable with my situation" to "refusing to accept I may not be able to walk because I've gotten all my hopes for the future wrapped up in that one thing" is a believable journey, but it would have been nice to see it play out longer. That said, how sad is it that it took crippling the character to get her featured in a number?

I'm continuing to enjoy Team Player Sue, and if they want to setup Bronze Medal Lady as the new Sue, I'm fine with that. But I was honestly hoping Will wouldn't come down on her for giving the kids a hard time. While I wouldn't want Sue's educational voice to be the only one the kids have, it's not terrible if it's one of many such voices. I mean, I'm sure Bieste gets in her players faces sometimes, and Will doesn't yell at her for that, and Sue's right: the kids could use some toughening up if they want to beat Vocal Adrenaline.  

Cooper's acting advice being hilariously awful was great ("Stanislavsky says the fingers are the eyes of the body, but he never mentions that the toes are the ears”), as was Kurt's reaction to him.

Rachel and Finn are starting to think getting married may not be the best idea. Yawn (though I loved Puck's pool cleaning ambitions).

The stuff at Six Flags was pretty pointless and boring. 

Favorite Song: "Still Standing" was a lot of fun, and it was nice to see Quinn featured, and I loved all three of Blaine's songs (even "Stronger"). This was a good episode for musical selection. Ultimately, I'll go with the Duran Duran mashup as my favorite simply because it landed so firmly in my wheelhouse. 

Brittany: It’s springtime. I would like to see something give birth.

Cooper: The key to a dramatic scene is pointing. When people are really emotional they point their fingers a lot.
Blaine: That’s not true at all. That’s terrible advice.

Cooper: Are you talking to me right now? Because I can’t tell unless you’re pointing at me.


Community: Virtual Systems Analysis


This episode is arguably even more difficult to unpack than "Critical Film Studies", the My Dinner with Andre-inspired examination of Abed's character from last season, this episode's most obvious spiritual partner. It deals with questions of identity and reality and how the two inform and limit the other in a way unlike any other. While this show is ostensibly a comedy, and this episode does have its humorous moments, this is not a terribly funny episode. But the characters here fit as effortlessly into this kind of story as they do in something self-referential, or a pop culture parody or the inspired lunacy of a paintball or pillow fort episode. Regardless of whatever the Dreamatorium that is the show puts up around them, the characters remain remarkably consistent and capable of moving the audience, whether to laugh or cry or get excited. For all the outright hilarious things I will all always remember from this show, I will also remember the image of Abed, chained in the locker he used to get shoved into, afraid that the only ending for him is one in which his friends leave him behind. This is a comedic show, but when it wants to be, it can be as deep and introspective as any drama while staying true to its characters, and that's yet another reason why it's so great.

Other Thoughts
Most of the humor in this episode came from the hospital drama/soap opera parodies as Annie searched for the real Abed, and it was all pretty funny.

All of the actors did a fantastic job of playing Abed or Annie playing them. The whole "body swapping" routine, when actors play their characters with the mind of another character, is one of those great TV devices.

Troy crying and Abed screaming are never not funny. 


Parks and Recreation: Live Ammo


Though this episode wasn't written with the knowledge of Parks and Rec's brief spring hiatus, it still serves as a nice tablesetter for the remaining episodes of the season. We're reminded of the struggles facing Leslie in her election campaign (both externally and from her own inability to compromise) while Leslie's victory is made personal for two more characters: if she loses, Ron won't be promoted, and Chris might lose his job. At the same time, we got a great glimpse of April's leadership abilities, as she is (hilariously) openly hostile with everyone. In the end, Leslie finds a way to make everyone happy at a personal political cost to herself, setting the stage for a win-or-die debate. The ending also reinforced the catch-22 to this storyline: in this day and age, faced with the kind of wealth and power the Newports have to yield, it seems highly unrealistic that Leslie could win this election. Yet at the same time, I want her to win. If the show goes down that road, I hope they find a way to make her victory realistic (at least within the show's reality).

Other Thoughts
Ann and Leslie's tour of Tom's amenities-laden apartment is probably the best thing yet to come out of the Ann/Tom relationship. My personal favorite was the ever-ready cheese platter; I wouldn't mind one of those myself.  

Between Cabin in the Woods and this, it's been a big couple weeks for Bradly Whitford. He did a nice job playing a relatively normal (and pragmatic) City Councilman, and I appreciated the Sorkin-esque walk-and-talks he got to do with Leslie.

Tom serving as April's right hand man and helping her get on track was a nice character moment for him. I always appreciate when Tom uses his smarm for good.

April: These animals should be rewarded for not being people. I hate people.

Andy: I got the ship out!

Ron: If you’ll excuse me, there’s a hot spinning cone of meat next door, and I plan to eat the whole thing.

7 comments:

Blam said...


Just out of curiosity, Teebore — Did you ever watch the last two (back-to-back) episodes of Alcatraz?

Game of Thrones: Garden of Bones

That was a pretty crazy ending, so let's start there.

I was surprised enough by the revelation of Melisandre's totally pregnant belly that the smoke monster totally caught me off guard. Her vajayjay is the Cave of [the God of] Light? What kind of funky man-stuff is Stannis Baratheon packing? Did she just take a really long drag an unfiltered stogie before getting off the boat and thought she'd charm smuggler dude by doing the ol' X-rated parlor trick?

up to now most of the magical elements on this show have been constrained to the edges of the world

This is a great point. I'd thought a lot about how magic is spoken of on the show as being rare and much less prevalent than it once was, as well as how mystic things seem to be resurgent — the hatched dragons, those creatures at the start of the very first episode Season 1 that nobody believed the survivor had seen, the stuff Melisandre is up to — but hadn't really made the association that this was happening on the periphery of "mainstream" Westeros culture. Although the way the Stark kids have bonded with the direwolves is fairly supernatural...

[Renly]'s becoming far too cocky

I'm not touching that one.

I did like the continued glimpse into Daenerys leadership style, as she managed to strike the right tone of regal authority and humble supplication to get her group inside the city's walls.

I agree, but I must say that the mispronunciation of Qarth bothered me. Maybe Daenerys has seen it spelled (properly or improperly) and been confused, maybe she's even heard it traditionally pronounced "Kwarth" — but more than one person from Qarth has just called it "Karth" standing right outside the gates of Qarth, so what with you pleading for hospitality and all you might want to follow their cue.

It's odd to say this about Tywin Lannister, but it was a relief to see him show up and tell everyone to knock it the hell off. His immediate recognition of Arya as a girl was great, and the idea of the missing Stark girl hiding under everyone's noses as Tywin's cup-bearer is both dryly funny and rich with dramatic promise.

Yes to all that stuff. The only thing that bugged me a bit was Tywin showing up just in the nick of time to save Gendry, but I guess such dramatic turns are easier to swallow in a saga that also has its fair share of surprising tragedy.

It's also nice to have at least one villain on the show who isn't a complete twit.  

Whom exactly do you consider the villains? To me that's one of the fascinating (and often frustrating) things about this show.

that scene showed us that Joffrey has finally become aware of the game, and is learning how to play it

And it's particularly interesting given that this followed the latest instance of Tyrion remarking upon Sansa's similar savviness (just to make sure the viewers get it, although, not to be a broken record, I'm not entirely buying what they're apparently selling). But while on one hand it felt particularly dastardly — which is saying something given what had just occurred — for Joffrey to send the ladies back to Uncle Tyrion so that he knew what had happened, on the other hand I'm not quite sure what broader message that was delivering beyond his pride in being a sociopathic black-hearted power-mad adolescent twat. "How dare you send me women for sex!" I mean... Wha—? Maybe I'd accept that it insulted him because, well, he's the king, he can take whatever (and whomever) he wants whenever he wants to, but the fact that Tyrion paid for the women suggests that certain things like, say, women from Littlefinger's House of Pleasure and Peeping Tomfoolery cost coin even in the royal court.

Blam said...


Once Upon a Time: The Return

Emma's cliffhanger-y declaration that she's getting back her son rang a bit hollow, considering she has yet to do anything very active in opposing Regina, and because we've seen, again and again, just how much Regina has stacked the deck in her favor

Not only that; Regina may be evil — and we, more then Emma, know just how evil — but Emma gave Henry up and Regina adopted him fair 'n' square. This wasn't even court-ordered foster care, where Emma pulling her life together and Henry wanting to be with her could matter. It's legal full-on parenting.

I suppose everyone's just calling it even at this point.

I'm with you on having a big whiplash moment there. Everyone had turned on Mary Margaret when her home-wrecking affair with David was revealed. And now that she's cleared of murder charges she's the town peach again? I can actually see that happening — they're so relieved, they realize they were overreacting — but there should have been some lip service to how MM's dire straits (and in fact the likelihood that she was being railroaded) brought folks to their senses. 'Cause MM was shunned in that Grumpy candle episode.

Someday I hope to be described as a "typewriter wrapped in an enigma wrapped in stubble".

I loved that line. Somebody, maybe even Nikki, mentioned over at Nikki's that Emma probably wouldn't say that unless she was being written by Jane Espenson, but I'm not sure I agree. Espenson-penned episodes are becoming as notable on this show as they were on Buffy and Angel, however, and even if it's partly hype the fact that she's really excited about the season finale has me expecting great things.

Blam said...


Glee: Big Brother

I can only imagine what that was like for anyone who waited weeks between the episodes

Actually, I thought that it worked because the passage of time happened for us as well as them.

Going from "comfortable with my situation" to "refusing to accept I may not be able to walk because I've gotten all my hopes for the future wrapped up in that one thing" is a believable journey, but it would have been nice to see it play out longer.

I totally agree. Part of why it's so frustrating is that, in addition to the rush not letting each emotional stage "land", there was so much drama to be wrought from the points that were blown by — Quinn understanding Artie more, Artie helping Quinn deal, Quinn frustrating Artie by her lack of acceptance of her situation, Artie struggling with having his newfound wheelchair buddy (if not potential romantic foil) even possibly getting to walk again when he can't, etc..

I'm sure Bieste gets in her players faces sometimes

I totally forgot about Coach Bieste.

though I loved Puck's pool cleaning ambitions

How did we not get a "Stacy's Mom" video out of that? Other than the fact that nobody's sunning by the pool in Ohio in March, I mean... (then again, with the weather this year anything could happen).

Ultimately, I'll go with the Duran Duran mashup as my favorite simply because it landed so firmly in my wheelhouse. 

I had greater hopes for it, actually. The vocals were so unecessarily processed and layered that I was completely distracted trying to imagine what it actually would've sounded like for the characters in that room in "reality". I also thought that the arrangement was kinda dippy.

However, I had a happy "Aha!" moment when the band on stage during Blaine and Cooper's duet in the auditorium disappeared the moment that the song was over. The last few episodes have very noticeably, to me, pointed out that the performances are usually a heightened reality that the show acknowledges as such, which makes me slightly unreasonably satsified.

What really shocked me was not just Artie and especially Quinn getting some featured numbers but all the numbers being either Blaine solos, Blaine/Cooper duets, or Artie/Quinn duets. I haven't looked it up, but it certainly felt like this was the first episode not to have a single Rachel solo.

Blam said...


Community: Virtual System Analysis

Annie: "Oh my God, I broke Abed."

... Wow. Just... Wow.

I basically didn't have any more notes than that and a bunch of great quotes.

Your brief analysis was spot-on. As much as I appreciated the work of the actors playing other characters playing their usual characters, as you said, and also appreciated that Annie the character (thanks, of course, to the creative staff making it so) went to the trouble of working with Abed within his frames of reference — changing the flow of boxes on the Dreamatorium's engine was as brilliant as it was catastrophic — what I really appreciated was how, for me at least, the episode continued the show's pattern of treating Abed's worldview as at least as valid as the more recognizable "reality" shared by the other characters.

Plus, Dean Pelton copping a quick feel of Jeff's right pec in the study room was randomly hilarious, and Blazer Tag = Laser Tag with sportcoats!

Abed: "You think this is just a room where Troy and I play Dinosaurs vs. Riverboat Gamblers together? Sure, it's how I got the construction approved, but much like myself the Dreamatorium has higher functions."

Abed: "I am able to simulate any of the study group and even a half-accurate Chang in over 7,000 unique situations."

Abed / Head Nurse Shirley: "Mr. Hawthorne... You're out of your bed again."
Abed / Tragic Heartwrenching Alzheimer's Patient and Emmy Contender Pierce Hawthorne: (wounded) "'Cause I think I'm on a train."

Annie: "Abed wasn't there. So whose memory is this?"
Abed / Jeff: "Maybe yours. Maybe the Dreamatorium really works. Or maybe Leonard was watching from the bushes and told Abed about it."

Parks and Recreation: Live Ammo

Ann and Leslie's tour of Tom's amenities-laden apartment is probably the best thing yet to come out of the Ann/Tom relationship.

I agree, except that I'd replace "best thing" with "only good thing". While I realize that Ann did once date Andy (largely out of inertia), and I still haven't seen any of Season Two, I just don't find any believable rationale for Ann launching a relationship with Tom in the first place.

And that line you quoted of Ron's was just the latest proof that the combo of this show's writing and Nick Offerman's delivery are gold. Did you know that he directed one of the episodes you skipped over? I haven't seen last night's yet, but apparently Amy Poehler wrote and directed that one.

Tom: "Come on, Little Sparkle. Don't give up! What does Leslie always say?"
April: "I don't know — weird stuff about waffles..."

Leslie: "Hey, Honey... Good morning! How did you sleep? I adopted 32 cats and dogs. Do you want some pancakes? I'm gonna make pancakes."

Sarah Ahiers said...

We pretty much hated that Glee episode. The songs were decent, and we love Somebody that I Used to Know, so that was a game saver for us. We were so full of rage and the ridiculosuness of quinn in a wheel chair. If she was really injured that badly, no way would she have even returned to school for the rest of the year, let alone be so healthy that she's able to return to school a week or two later without even a scratch or a bruise. And then she goes to a wheel chair skate park, because not only did she get severely injured and yet somehow managed to heal miraculously fast (except for her spine, natch) but she's so good, that she can actually do cool athletics and junk.

Seriously, i mean, i can suspend my disbelief for a lot, and i have in the past for glee, with the missing parents and imaginary bands and stuff, but this just really felt like a slap in the face and i really think this episode was the beginning of the end for us.

I really have nothing to add to your GoT talk because i agree with pretty much everything. Who know i could immediately love Tywin Lannister after greatly disliking him earlier

Teebore said...

@Blam: Did you ever watch the last two (back-to-back) episodes of Alcatraz?

Not yet, but they're on the DVR. I'm planning to get to them before the (TV) season ends, so if you have notes, hang on to 'em.

Although the way the Stark kids have bonded with the direwolves is fairly supernatural...

True, though even Winterfell is considered on the fringes by some. And the characters have been pretty dense about the extent to which that bonding has occurred, to the point where even though it's obvious to the audience what is happening, the show itself seems determined to play coy about it.

I'm not touching that one.

Ha! I wish I could say the innuendo in that line was intentional.

but more than one person from Qarth has just called it "Karth" standing right outside the gates of Qarth, so what with you pleading for hospitality and all you might want to follow their cue.

And, of course, the whole sequence felt like a nod to the fans - "this is how it's pronounced *wink* - in much the same way JK Rowling wrote a phonetic pronunciation of Hermione's name into one of the Harry Potter books, making Dany's flub all the more grating.

Whom exactly do you consider the villains? To me that's one of the fascinating (and often frustrating) things about this show.

At this point, Joffrey, Cersei, Tywin, Jaimie. Basically all the Lannisters, sans Tyrion. And whomever is leading/controlling the White Walkers north of the wall, if such a person exists.

But this is definitely a show where the lines between good guys and bad guys are blurred, which is, as you say, both fascinating and frustrating at times.

on the other hand I'm not quite sure what broader message that was delivering beyond his pride in being a sociopathic black-hearted power-mad adolescent twat.

I took his message to Tyrion to be "I know you didn't send these women out of the kindness of your heart, and if you think this will stop me from being a cruel, sadistic twat, you're wrong. Also, this gesture doesn't forgive you for chastising me in front of the entire court."

This wasn't even court-ordered foster care, where Emma pulling her life together and Henry wanting to be with her could matter. It's legal full-on parenting.

Exactly! Even if Regina didn't have the deck stacked in her favor, it isn't like Emma has much recourse here...

Actually, I thought that it worked because the passage of time happened for us as well as them.

Hmm, good point. Maybe my back-to-back viewing negatively colored my reaction to that plot.

I totally forgot about Coach Bieste.

No worries, so has Glee.

The vocals were so unecessarily processed and layered that I was completely distracted trying to imagine what it actually would've sounded like for the characters in that room in "reality".

Yeah, I'll freely admit the autotuning/processing was particularly egregious, and I usually have a bad ear for such things (which means it must have been really bad. I guess I just enjoyed the energy.

The last few episodes have very noticeably, to me, pointed out that the performances are usually a heightened reality that the show acknowledges as such, which makes me slightly unreasonably satsified.

Good point, and I agree.


I agree, except that I'd replace "best thing" with "only good thing".


Yeah, I really meant the latter.

April: "I don't know — weird stuff about waffles..."

That might have been my favorite line of the episode.

Teebore said...

@Sarah: If she was really injured that badly, no way would she have even returned to school for the rest of the year, let alone be so healthy that she's able to return to school a week or two later without even a scratch or a bruise.

Maybe because the time frame was thrown off for me (not having the wait between episodes) but I never even considered the timing of it. Did the show ever make it clear how much time had passed (if so, I totally missed it)? I figured it had been at least a month or so, in which case it didn't seem odd to me that she'd be out of the hospital.

But then again, I have no actual idea how stuff like that works (if anything, I feel like people are actually in hospitals less time than they should be; giving birth is almost outpatient at this point), and this is the show that fit an entire family dinner, elaborate bedtime routine, fight and make-up before 7:15 PM, so it isn't like I'm going to defend it very vehemently.

And then she goes to a wheel chair skate park, because not only did she get severely injured and yet somehow managed to heal miraculously fast (except for her spine, natch) but she's so good, that she can actually do cool athletics and junk.

Did she though? I was admittedly checking Twitter during this sequence because it was pretty dumb, but I thought she just sort of rolled around a bit; I mean, was she actually doing flips and junk, because that would be beyond ridiculous.